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20121201
20121231
STATION
CNBC 9
WHUT (Howard University Television) 6
KQED (PBS) 4
WETA 3
FBC 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
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English 25
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
. as for the action in europe, really, the action focuses on italy where there's an impending political regime change. more on that in just a moment. the road map starts at the golden arches. mcdonald's blowing out expectations for november sales after the dismal drop in the month of october. hoping to fuel the rise, the bacon/onion/cheddar sandwich. >> there's one thing for certain, taxes on top earners are going up. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had thi
decliners well outpacing advancers. the ftse mib in italy down .6%. the ibex down .4%. the dax selling off .5% lower than yesterday. same goes for the ft. if it is, down .8%. 5909. how quickly we've gone from talking about 6,000 to talking about 5,900. the german bund rallying. same goes for the uk. we're seeing a rotation into safety, out of risk and out of spain and italy. about 4.5% for italy. thin trading in markets is exacerbating the move that we're seeing as we approach the year. today, the austy dollar is weaker against the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so for trading in asia, just how japan, china and the rest have been affected by fiscal cliff news, diedra morris is join onning us with plenty more. hi. >> hey, kelly. it was a bit of a rude awaking. a lot of these indexes were on their way to gains and then we had the fiscal cliff setback. we had news that john
at greece, but also they're watching the problems in italy. the news that mariom onti -- monti will step down. that's really dragging down the mood. >> let's look at some market numbers. dax closing up. stoxx 50 at 2624. the dow jones is currently up almost 1%. the euro is trading at $1.3007. >> agrees has reached their target in a bond buyback scheme, at least they are calling to the state tv. >> they bought the bonds at a discount of 70% from investors and the private banks. this was a condition for them to receive further eu funds. finance ministers are set to meet to discuss releasing the bailout funds. british banking giant hsbc has agreed to pay a record $1.9 billion to settle a money- laundering case. investigated by authorities in the united states. >> hsbc was accused of using the u.s. financial system to transfer funds from mexican drug cartels and from countries like iran that had been placed under international sanctions. >> the u.s. government says hsbc invaded these practices. they've have been said to enabled terrorists and others to ensure bent sanctions. despite the heft
't want to indicate this or that person, then everything became political. and in italy when something becomes political, and controversial, politically speaking then the only thing that you can do is to leave. but 19 years are part of my best years in my musical career. so i said, you know, to explain exactly details what happened is impossible. and the newspapers generally made a mess of the entire story because they didn't know exactly the details. they thought that the orchestra was against me but this is not true. >> not true, absolutely not true. i never had a fight with an orchestra in my life. but there were reasons outside of the artistic field that created a situation and we couldn't kmup kate any more. we had completely different ideas. >> there was no one that could have made a difference? >> no, because we mentioned before this dictator, you know, in a very delicate way. but mussolini, one time said speaking about italy, the italians said one phrase that is memorable. one phrase was interesting. they said to control it, to govern the italians is not difficult. it is imposs
the message, and this programs of sistema happens in los angeles, in scotland, in sweden, in korea, in italy, in germany, not only los angeles in the states but it is happening in a lot of programs inspired by sistema, it is only to help that, you know, to develop the idea of music as a human right. >> rose: yes. >> it is a -- well, like this guy is talking about something really crazy. but i think art has to be an element of society, to be better citizens, to be a better human beings, we are not talking about something new. wwe can go back, you know, in times, you know, when art was an element, an essential element of the men. and that is something that we need in this -- >> rose: it speaks to who we are and what we want to become. >> exactly. especially in in very cultivated world where -- >> rose: yeah. >> where we have to build something better, something more sensible for -- >> rose: when you accepted the job at the la philharmonic, why there? >> one of my first commitments was at los angeles, after i won the competition,. i remember invited me. >> rose: the then conductor. >> exactly.
back as we're talking, rallied back quite a bit in the ten-year bond futures in italy but you know what, politics aside, mario draghi bought himself and europe some time. i don't know what they'll do with it, it will be 2013's story. >> you nailed it, to me every strategy since the crisis hit in this country in my opinion you could call it kick the can but it's about we have no idea what the effects are going to be, what the exit will be or if any of this is going to work but trying to buy time for something to happen. that something has to be growth and i still don't see how europe has a plan for more growth. >> we know greece is done with because they've already restructured their debt and what they did in the last two weeks, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >>
. >> the european markets are closing now. >> remember yesterday and all that concern we had about where italy might go with the resignation of mario monti. greece is higher. por sh gal is higher. spain is higher. it's a good day for -- investor sentiment.strongly it was revealed today. optimism over what the fed is going to do in the united states tomorrow. optimism there will be a deal on the fiscal cliff. you have optimism that the recapitalization of the banks is going to be delayed by another year according to the bank of italy. and you have optimism as well on mar of election promises as we now face the pros wekt of a much earlier election in italy. to that end it is fascinating. sylvia berlusconi has come out today warning about the germano center of politics. in other words, too much of a focus on what is happening from germany and the austerity inspired by angela merkel. in particular, he is drawing attention to this. which is the spread of the extra that investors demand to hold italian bonds over german bonds. i've shown this to you a couple times. over the last year it's been a mainstay
of comments about what happens happening in europe and the need to liberalize the taxi systems in italy and so forth. are you comfortable with the system you have now in new york? i understand the medallion changes hands for $800,000. so you have a few people who control a lot of these licenses. who are creaming off most of the profits. then you have often first generation immigrants who are tearing around on the street 12-hour days trying to make a living? is that fair? >> medallion now trades for $1 million. so i think that does prove your point in a sense. look, we are -- the biggest issue in new york city is outside the core service area in midtown, downtown manhattan. mayor bloomberg has gotten legislation out to let us create a whole separate class of taxis that will operate in the boroughs. we do need more cabs. that $1 million price -- >> did it get approved? >> the governor signed it, the taxi owners, they have a lot at stake. they've sued and it's in court now. we're going to get a final decision by may or june. i'm sure we're going to win and put the new meltions on the street. >> d
in their economy, if not a recession. >> yes. you can see it in italy. you can see it in japan. the reason for that is that the number of workers supporting the proportionate number of retirees to ross over time. there simply is not as much money being kicked into a system. stuart: japan has a far bigger debt than any european country and far bigger than the united states. i think that is true as a proportion of the gdp. >> when you add all the debt to gather, the figure is far higher. in fact, it is closer to 500% of gdp. stuart: hold on, let's get back to america. we have a lower birthrate. the loss in american history. but don't we also have mass immigration, which makes up, i think, for a lower birthrate. our population still experience. we are nowhere near the japan issue, really. >> this is the beginning of another step that reinforces the fact that we are headed down the same path. japan has had eight failed fiscal stimulus programs. we have had three or four, depending on how you count them. at what point, do we stop in washington and say we may have a fundamental problem here. the
into another recession. thirty-two people dead, including two americans off the coast of italy. when the cost of concorde a cruise ship runs aground >> more than 79 people killed and 8000 injured. a district court says that they would like to oust president hosni mubarak to life in prison. and mohammed morsi, of the muslim brotherhood party takes charge for it in november, he grants himself absolute power that brings thousands of protesters to the streets of cairo, egypt. three members of a russian all-female punk band stage a protest against vladimir putin are sent to jail for hooliganism. inciting worldwide protest and demand for the release. rupert murdoch launches into the successor role of news of the world. president bashar al-assad and a cease-fire agreement, negotiated by former u.n. secretary. tens of thousands of people killed since march of last year. the death toll continues climbing almost daily. green on blue insider attacks increasing in afghanistan. one in 50 u.s. and international soldiers killed this year by their afghan partners. it is pop and circumstance for great britain
much better. you throw up the bund. many areas whether you talk italy or indeed greece, rates are moving down. that isn't a bad thing for funding but it does ehave peopl look at spain saying they'll do bank bailout, old program, not country bailout new program. the correction was small. goldman says stocks are the place to be. kind of making this trade a little more true than it was on its knee jerk. if you look at putting it together. you can see we're up several basis points. still not huge. if you open it up to a one-month chart, you can see that 160 remains the pivot. it's still about europe. don't despair. i'm sure the red herring of bashing tax policy in the u.s. will get to the front page before the end of the session. >> thank you very much. let's check out latest news in energy and medals with sharon epperson. >> it's the euro that we see in euro dollar helping commodities and risk on trade across the board in the sector. the fact that we are looking at that euro dollar and above 130 level is significant. also keep in mind that we did get improving factory activity. t
. for example italy managed to auction some debt today, the longer end of the market. and there was no great move. can we have a look at that? there was no great move of the ten-year yield as a result. maybe we'll come back in a moment. let's just focus on the close out. >> the european markets are closing now. >> it is negative territory as you can see. the fiscal cliff of course plays a part in that taking some of those -- in many senses you could call it profit taking -- not in the case of spain where you see a major underperformance. >> let me say the german finance minister suggested he thought the worst of the eurozone crisis is now past. he said the government in athens knows it cannot financially over burden the rest of the eurozone countries and is acting as it should. he was optimistic on france as well despite the fact the data is indicating we'll still get a contraction in the third quarter, for most of the eurozone. germany's economic position is arguably deteriorating but still schauble there is relatively optimistic that the crisis is over. in the meantime what is also happeni
% but falling. it's also true of italy. there the yields are down. take a look at where we are on the ten year, 4.4% and those bonds rise in value, you see the italian banks, for example, rising in value. the stock market, it's obvious the value of their assets is gaining ground. other financials around europe, the likes of kbc, bank of ireland, a lot of questions to the degree the irish can get better terms for their bailout or deal as a result of what the greeks have been given. there is -- and carl mentioned this, one area of concern today, and that's the finance minister's meeting where the frie french and the germans seem at odds over how they're going to get banking union, the germans are saying it cannot -- the individual banks cannot all be controlled by the ecb, the french saying, yes, they should be. that's the german finance minister. they are very split. they will try to hammer out a deal again middle of next weak. we're close now to the summit, the full heads of state summit. by then they should have a banking deal. what's interesting is with the backstop of the ecb we'll buy bond
the cliff that is force austerity, that is firing people. look at spain when they got serious. italy. it meant a lot of firings. he says i see what we are going to do follow these countries that have fiscal responsibility a lot of people are going to be fired. don't worry, i'm going to do my best. what what are you going to do to keep people employed? >> keeping the heat on congress, came up a number of times, of course energy the press conference that followed the fed announcement but unclear what impact it will have. >> and as far as ben bernanke can do only so much he can do we all know the market's addition to the additional stimulus and the more -- increased transparency in terms of what the fed is going to target in the future, that causes the stocks to go up for maybe an hour's worth of time and then resume trading as if nothing happened. >> in the years i have been following the fed there is always a strange dichotomy, seems like the market initially gets everything wrong. but what i have always felt, in the end, we take solace, if the fed says things are getting better we ge
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)